Mixed-Use Project Passes Muster with City Council

Dynamic Development to Build in Los Feliz



After months of appeals, a proposed mixed-use development in Los Feliz, CA was just approved by the Los Angeles City Council.

Ten city councilmembers voted this week in favor of Santa Monica’s Dynamic Development Company project, called “The 1860,” to be built at 1860 N. Western Ave., near the intersection of Western and Franklin Avenues.

A single-story, single-family residence and a single-story duplex would be demolished to build the five-story, 97,334-square-foot development, which would include 6,000 square feet of commercial space on the ground floor.
A Valero gas station, which has been at that address for 47 years, would also be torn down.

The project will feature studios, one- and two-bedroom residences with 112 on-site parking spaces. There will also be 11,569 square feet of open space, including a common area on the ground floor and a podium-level courtyard, in addition to an indoor / outdoor fitness center, club room and a sky lounge.

“The many regulatory restraints and community expectations have forged not one simple building, but a village-like combination of uses, forms and materials,” Mark Oberholzer, associate principal at Irvine’s KTGY Architecture + Planning said in a statement. “For example, the Courtyard faces north, which is unusual, but it brings smaller massing requested by neighbors to the north. In other areas as well, massing has been broken down and corners erased in an open, welcoming manner.”

There will be 87 units with 11 of them, or 20 percent, set aside for affordable housing. The developer, which scaled back the project, also plans to make it as transit-oriented as possible since it’s near the Metro Red Line.

Now that they’ve gotten the go ahead, Dynamic Development does not plan to waste any time in getting the project off the ground, according to its representative Aaron Green, president of Afriat Consulting.

“My client’s intent is to go full speed ahead and get this great neighborhood-serving project to the community as quickly as possible,” Green said.

However, he acknowledged it will take some time given the city’s building permit process.
A groundbreaking is expected to take place next year, according to KTGY Architecture + Planning.

The Los Angeles Planning Commission also approved the development in February at a meeting where more than a dozen residents showed up to voice their concerns about it – which included a desire for more affordable housing as part of the project and the type of retailers that might set up shop in the commercial space. Some who live on site also complained that they would lose their homes.

The project was first proposed a couple of years ago.

The area has largely been passed over when it comes to multifamily projects, according to CoStar research. The majority of multifamily supply in the neighborhood was built more than 20 years ago.